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  • 22Oct 14

    Breitbart Op-Ed: Religious Freedom Dying at Altar of Political Correctness

    On October 31, 1517, Martin Luther posted his Ninety-Five theses on the door of the Castle Church of Wittenberg. Christianity was for all time changed by one man's confrontation with authority. For his audacity, for alleging that one's path to heaven could not be purchased, Luther was excommunicated. It took great bravery to challenge what was then considered to be the ultimate arbiter of God's will. Luther was told, effectively, that his pathway to heaven was foreclosed. When the Mayor of Houston, sent her legal attack dogs to demand the sermons of ministers who opposed an ordinance that might prevent churches from hiring people who adhered to a traditional faith, my first thought was of Martin Luther and my hope was that someone would, in elaborate calligraphy, stencil the First Amendment upon parchment and nail it to the doors of city hall. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” The Amendment was clear, and its intent was not to keep religious people out of government, but rather to keep government out of religion. There has been, and will be, an ongoing debate about the role of government in marriage—what our laws should be, and where they are made. But make no mistake—that’s not what this is about. Some will make this debate about freedom of choice, but the only way this is about choice is if we are talking about the choice with regards to expression. No one, no law is advocating any restriction on the choices of consenting adults, but for goodness sakes are we so politically correct that we will stifle dissent? Will there be no room for people who have traditional beliefs? In the same way the law should not restrict consenting adults, likewise the law should have nothing to do with restricting or restraining the free exercise of a religious people who object.  Consenting adults of a religious persuasion should not have their ideas monitored. Religious beliefs cannot and should not be trumped by political correctness. No law should prevent religious people from coming together and discussing what they believe to be right and wrong. Dissent may well be the foremost of freedoms necessary to restrain despotism.   Foremost among these freedoms—mentioned specifically in the amendment, and even before speech—is the free exercise of religion. Nothing chills dissent, speech, or the free exercise of religion like the heavy hand of government, which is why the Mayor of Houston attacking the pulpit is so extreme, and needs to be spoken out against, now, loudly. When sermons are censored or demanded to be produced, then we are in danger. I don't care if the sermons castigate the immorality of instant replay, freedom absolutely requires dissent. Anything short of full dissent is not freedom and should be fought with vigor, no matter your opinion on the subject at hand. The First Amendment cannot be allowed to wither and die on the altar of political correctness. Maybe it's time to nail it to the door of every city hall, state capital and entrance to Congress every day, so they have a daily reminder of what they're not allowed to do.
  • 5Sep 14

    The Politico 50: The Most Interesting Man in Politics

    A civil liberties-loving peacenik with millennial appeal? Who's willing to show up even at a midsummer NAACP convention to talk to a near-empty room? There's no doubt Rand Paul is turning out to be a different kind of Republican, bringing libertarian-and contrarian-ideas to the national stage in a novel and calculated blurring of Washington's otherwise rigid ideological battle lines.
  • 4Sep 14

    TIME Op-Ed: ‘I Am Not an Isolationist’

    Some pundits are surprised that I support destroying the Islamic State in Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) militarily. They shouldn't be. I've said since I began public life that I am not an isolationist, nor am I an interventionist. I look at the world, and consider war, realistically and constitutionally.
  • 3Sep 14

    Fox News Op-Ed: Saving sight on my recent medical mission trip to Guatemala

    I recently returned from a medical mission to Guatemala organized by the John Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah. 
  • 28Aug 14

    Wall Street Journal Op-Ed: How U.S. Interventionists Abetted the Rise of ISIS

    As the murderous, terrorist Islamic State continues to threaten Iraq, the region and potentially the United States, it is vitally important that we examine how this problem arose. Any actions we take today must be informed by what we've already done in the past, and how effective our actions have been.
  • 14Aug 14

    TIME Op-Ed: We Must Demilitarize the Police

    The shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown is an awful tragedy that continues to send shockwaves through the community of Ferguson, Missouri and across the nation.If I had been told to get out of the street as a teenager, there would have been a distinct possibility that I might have smarted off. But, I wouldn't have expected to be shot.
  • 1Aug 14

    National Review Op-Ed: The Unintended Consequences of Interventionism

      On Saturday, our State Department fled the chaos of the Libyan civil war. One wonders if President Obama ever reconsiders his unilateral presidential war with Libya? President Obama went to war in Libya without congressional authority. The Constitution is quite clear: The power to go to war resides with the legislature. Madison made this point explicit when he wrote:  The Constitution supposes, what the History of all Governments demonstrates, that the Executive is the branch of power most interested in war, and most prone to it. It has accordingly with studied care vested the question of war to the Legislature.  
  • 22Jul 14

    WCPO Cincinnati Op-Ed: Let's Give Non-Violent Offenders A Second Chance

    The biggest impediment to voting and employment in our country is a criminal record. Many young people could escape this trap if criminal justice were reformed, if records were expunged after time served and if nonviolent crimes did not become a permanent blot preventing employment.
  • 14Jul 14

    USA Today Op-Ed: Give kids a second chance after drug crime

    A friend of mine's brother was convicted of a felony for growing marijuana plants in his college dorm. Thirty years later he still can't vote and his felony record prevents him from getting a good job.  
  • 14Jul 14

    Politico Op-Ed: Rick Perry Is Dead Wrong

    There are many things I like about Texas Gov. Rick Perry, including his stance on the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution. But apparently his new glasses haven't altered his perception of the world, or allowed him to see it any more clearly.
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Contact Senator Rand Paul at One of his Offices

Bowling Green - Main State Office
1029 State Street
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Phone: 270-782-8303

Owensboro
423 Federica St, Ste 305
Owensboro, KY 42301
Phone: 270-689-9085

Crescent Springs
541 Buttermilk Pk Ste 102
Crescent Springs, KY 41017
Phone: 859-426-0165

Lexington
771 Corporate Dr, Ste 105
Lexington, KY 40503
Phone: 859-219-2239

Louisville
600 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Pl,
Rm 1072B
Louisville, KY 40202
Phone: 502-582-5341

Hopkinsville
1100 S. Main St, Ste 12
Hopkinsville, KY 42240
Phone: 270-885-1212

Washington, DC
124 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington DC, 20510
Phone: 202-224-4343