Putting Patients First

During the 111th Congress passed and President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) - commonly known as "Obamacare" (P.L. 111-148). This legislation rapidly expanded the powers of government into the health care system. Since the passage of Obamacare, states, businesses, and other institutions have filed Constitutional challenges to many of the burdensome provisions of the law. While the Supreme Court has ruled on the provision of Obamacare that requires individuals to purchase approved health insurance or pay a penalty, dozens of lawsuits remain pending on various aspects of the law.

I was not a member of the United States Senate during the 111th Congress, but if I had been I would have voted against Obamacare. As you may know, in the 113thCongress, I am an original cosponsor of S. 177 , which would fully repeal the government takeover of our health care system.

In May 2013, The House of Representatives voted for the third time to fully repeal Obamacare when they passed H.R. 45, sponsored by Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.), by a vote of 229-195. The bill has been placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar where it awaits further consideration.

As a doctor, I have had firsthand experience with the vast problems facing health care in the United States. Like other areas of the economy where the federal government wields its heavy hand, health care is over-regulated and in need of serious market reforms. Government interventions in health care have driven up the cost of coverage. I have long supported making all medical expenses tax deductible, allowing insurance to be bought across state lines, tort reform (state-level), and empowering all citizens to save for health expenses by removing the high-deductible insurance policy requirement to access to Health Savings Accounts .

More freedom to choose and innovate will make sure our health care system remains the best in the world. As your Senator, I am working to ensure that real free market principles are applied to the American health care system so that it is responsive to patients, families, and doctors rather than government bureaucracy.